About

It all began a long, long time ago …

As a child I loved poking through the rock shop near my house. All those bins of interesting rocks just fed my love of stones and my collection grew large. In high school I developed a love of both handmade and Scandinavian jewelry and started a collection of both. Luckily I kept some of those pieces since I have no idea what happened to my rocks! Then I bought a length of sterling wire from the rock shop, twisted it and that bracelet stayed on my wrist for years. Who knew that was all leading me to what I was meant to do with my life…

At the time I graduated high school they had decided there were too many teachers so my plans changed and I went to college to be a dental assistant. My favorite classes turned out to be the lab classes, carving wax teeth and making crowns for teeth. Moving forward, out of college and working in the dental profession I had a great idea for a ring but couldn’t find anyone to make it for me. Since crowns for your teeth and rings are both made by the lost wax casting method, I decided to try making it myself. I found a community education class where I could use their casting equipment and a new love was born. I owe a lot to the instructor of that class, a high school pottery and jewelry teacher named Marty Hale. He encouraged me to take the early jewelry I made into a local gallery and in 1976, a new career was born. I continued to work both in the dental profession and do my jewelry until 1987 when I decided to put all my effort into my jewelry.

My work has gone through a lot of changes through the years. I started with all sterling silver, lots of rings and then added some gold. I then switched over to all gold, concentrating on rings with asymmetrical stones, and a large line of earrings. Then after many years of being primarily self-taught, I went to Taos New Mexico in 1987 and took a class from Harold O’Connor. One thing he said to me was that I was no longer a metalsmith but had become a wax worker. (All my rings were made using the lost wax casting method where they are carved out of wax first). I took offense until I realized that he was right. I was spending more time working in wax than on the metal. So Harold opened up a whole new world of possibilities for me when he taught me to fuse 24k gold (pure gold) to sterling silver using a mouth-held blowtorch. I went back to being a metalsmith.

Since that time I’ve continued to fabricate my jewelry, currently using 22k gold fused to sterling although due to the current metal price, a little more 18k gold is creeping in. I’ve taken classes and workshops around the country from amazing people which have continued to add to my end result. My work continues to change and grow. Right now with the world seemingly so chaotic, I’m finding the need for calmer, simpler designs. Not as fussy. Quieter, more peaceful. I think I’ve accomplished that…